The ‘Mother Road’ – Missouri Route 66 attractions

Route 66 runs almost 2,500 miles from Chicago to Santa Monica. Route 66 is known for its kitschy manmade attractions, as well as natural attractions. Almost 315 miles of the highway run through Missouri. A 50-mile stretch from Waynesville to Cuba provides entertaining and historical points of interest. During our visit to Pulaski County, the […]

Travels 2016: Showing off great attractions in Missouri

History and beauty topped our visits to Missouri during 2016. From the days of Lewis and Clark to beautiful art, we enjoyed our stops in Kansas City, St. Joseph, as well as Pulaski County. Pulaski County ranks high on my list of fun trips. We took in the Civil War, Route 66, an old railroad […]

Tour the dining world in Missouri’s Pulaski County

Something from Column A. An item from Column B. Next thing you know, you’ve traveled the world, tasting some of the best food there is to offer. All, within a 15-minute drive. This is the culinary world of Pulaski County in Missouri. A taste of Asia. A dabble of Europe. And who can pass up […]

Pulaski County’s rail history is told through the Frisco Trail

Pulaski County cuts through the south central portion of Missouri. The county seems to be separated almost in half by Interstate 44, which eventually runs to St. Louis. The county’s history seems to be divided by that line, as well. The southern half runs along a part of the famous Route 66, which connects several […]

Civil War reenactment highlights Pulaski County’s Old Settlers Day celebration

Waynesville, Missouri, likely saw more Civil War action during its recent Old Settlers Day than it did during the actual Civil War in the 1860s. Pulaski County, which Waynesville is the county seat, experienced skirmishes between the Union Army and Confederate soldiers and sympathizers. The Union army actually operated a fort atop a hill overlooking […]

Driving Route 66 through Pulaski County, Missouri

Long before Route 66 ran through Pulaski County, Mastodons roamed south central Missouri. Native Americans used the trail to hunt animals. White settlers used the route to travel to Springfield and St. Louis. In the early 1900s, it was a gravel road. Then, in the mid-1920s, Route 66 was built to run from Chicago to […]

History runs through Pulaski County, Missouri

More than 100,000 Native Americans were forced from their homes in the southeastern United States and marched thousands of miles to “Indian territory” (now Oklahoma) in the late 1830s. This forced migration has been known as the “Trail of Tears.” The march found its way along the Roubidoux Creek in Waynesville, Missouri. Natives camped here […]

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