Snoqualmie Falls’ beauty adds to Washington charm

Snoqualmie Falls

Snoqualmie Falls is about an hour west of Seattle.

As we entered downtown Snoqualmie, Washington, I half expected to see the dancing man (aka The Man from Another Place) from the television series “Twin Peaks” doing his thing in the middle of the street. As we passed a coffee shop, I could swear I saw FBI Agent Dale Cooper commenting about what “a fine cup of coffee” it was. Then, I learned that Snoqualmie Falls, the actual waterfalls just outside of town, was featured in the short-run ABC series from the early 1990s.

Snoqualmie Falls is one of the most beautiful waterfalls we’ve ever seen. And, it’s one of the most popular attractions in the state. It’s 268 feet tall. The spray and mist coming off the bottom add to the falls’ charm.

The falls park is two acres and has a couple of observation decks, which offer slightly different views of the waterfalls. A visitors center and gift shop is located nearby.

Snoqualmie Falls

Forest along the river.

The Snoqualmie River historically has been revered by Native Americans. The Snoqualmie tribe believes humans were created at the spot. The mist and spray are connections between Earth and the spiritual realm.

Today, the river is used to generate electricity. Power plants are located along the Snoqualmie River.

However, nature is a strong creature and the area provides beauty beyond the waterfalls. We hiked down to the river’s shoreline. An observation deck is located near the river. You can walk to the river to get a better view. Rocks along the shoreline are great places to stand or sit and take in the views.

Snoqualmie Falls

The Snoqualmie River.

The walk down to the river gives visitors a chance to see some tall trees, among the variety of vegetation. Photographers will love the photo opps along the way.

Snoqualmie Falls

We love the trees in the Pacific Northwest.

However, as with any natural area, you have to be aware of wild life. Bears and mountain lions could be in the area. We searched, but we couldn’t find a Sasquatch. Darn it! I so wanted to have my version of “Harry and the Hendersons.”

Snoqualmie Falls

Love the humor even on a serious subject.

While we enjoyed our visit to the Snoqualmie Falls, we knew there was more to explore. We headed to the Snoqualmie railroad depot museum. The Northwest Railway Museum is an outdoor attraction, several blocks long – consisting of refurbished train cars and ones in need of repair. The museum is free to the public daily (except three holidays – Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day).

Snoqualmie Falls

Northwest Railway Museum’s depot.

The historic depot was built in 1890 and has been restored to reflect that era. The depot has a children’s activity area where they can learn about trains and railroads in an interactive environment.

Train cars of all types are located around the depot and along the museum’s walking area. We saw train engines, hospital cars, passenger cars, as well as a caboose.

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An exhibit looks at hauling some of the trees from the Cascade Mountains. In looking at an example of a large tree carried by rail that had to be a challenge.

Snoqualmie Falls

Check out the size of the log.

Our walk continued to the “graveyard” of train cars. The cars in this area actually appealed to me more than the refurbished ones. Some may think this is where trains go to die, but some of them will likely be refurbished and someday look almost brand new. Seeing what some of the cars look like before any refurbishment work starts makes the end product even more impressive.

Snoqualmie Falls

An old train and car in the “graveyard.”

Downtown Snoqualmie looks like something out a television series. It has a certain charm that makes you like the town immediately. The people were friendly.

Snoqualmie Falls

Downtown Snoqualmie Falls reminded me of the TV series “Twin Peaks.”

They apparently are proud of their logging history, as evidenced by a beautiful mural in the middle of downtown.

Snoqualmie Falls

The artist used a 1943 photo to paint the mural.

The view of the forests and mountains was breathtaking. I feel like I stopped every few feet to take in the sights and sounds. Running water in a creek, surrounded by trees and mountains in the background just added to the positive vibe.

Snoqualmie Falls

The view of the mountains and forests was impressive.

We indulged in lunch during our visit. We enjoyed a great pasta lunch at Copperstone restaurant. The food was impressive. Lisa had a chicken parmesan sandwich. It had lightly breaded chicken strips on a hoagie, topped with marinara sauce and Mozzarella and parmesan cheese. She liked it. I went with the traditional spaghetti with meatballs. I enjoyed my lunch, as well.

Snoqualmie Falls

View outside from inside the Copperstone.

Snoqualmie Falls was a fun day trip from Seattle, about an hour’s drive west. We recommend visiting the area when in Seattle.

For more information on Snoqualmie Falls and its attractions, please visit www.snoqualmiefalls.com, www.ci.snoqualmie.wa.us/Visitors.aspx and www.trainmuseum.org.